XRay





 


Why do an X-ray exam?
X-ray exams are still the mainstay of diagnostic imaging. They can offer an accurate “look inside” to uncover anatomic problems. Commonly, x-rays are used to assess bones and joints for breaks, dislocations, or problems with arthritis. Chest x-rays are frequently used to diagnose the conditions behind persistent coughs, shortness or breath, wheezing, question of possible pneumonia, etc. Other parts of the body commonly examined by x-ray are the spine and abdomen.

How is an X-ray exam performed?
An X-Ray or computed radiography exam is quite simple for the patient. The part of the body to be imaged is placed against the image receptor and an instruction is given for you to hold still or hold your breath. In a split second the image is obtained by one of our x-ray technologists specially trained in anatomy, x-ray safety, and obtaining x-ray images.

How do I prepare for my digital X-ray exam?
There is no specific preparation for a general plain x-ray. Please see the list below x-ray procedure preparations. Occasionally appointments can be completed on a walk-in basis. It is important, however, that you bring the requisition from you doctor stating what x-ray is needed and the reason for the exam.

Other important information:
Since x-ray exams utilize radiation, it is recommended that these exams be avoided during pregnancy. Therefore, if there is any chance of pregnancy, we need to be informed so that alternatives to x-ray imaging can be considered.

A patient’s weight must also be taken into consideration with x-ray exams. The clarity of the x-ray image decreases with increasing weight. Also, the x-ray exam tables have a moveable top surface so that the body part being examined can be aligned properly with the x-ray tube for accurate images. The manufacturers have all constructed these table with weight limits beyond which these top surfaces malfunction and break. Because of these factors, the weight limit established is 300 lbs.

How will I learn about the results?
Your images will then be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who will issue a timely report to your doctor.

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X-RAY PROCEDURE PREPARATIONS:

Upper GI / Esophagus / Small Bowel: Nothing to eat or drink after midnight. May take usual medications with water.

Myelogram: Light breakfast the morning of exam. Increase fluids the night before and morning of the procedure. If you are taking blood thinners, such as Coumadin, please notify InnerVision.

Arthrograms: If you are taking blood thinners, such as Coumadin, please notify InnerVision.

Biopsies: Nothing to eat or drink for four hours prior to the procedure. If you are taking blood thinners, such as Coumadin, please notify InnerVision.

Sialogram: Nothing to eat or drink for four hours prior to the procedure. Make take usual mediciations.

(One of our InnerVision nurses will be contacting you in advance to inform you of your specific instructions for your test.)

Questions/Concerns:
Please contact us at 765.447.7447

The Official Imaging Center for Purdue Athletics